Blackwatertown

By Paul Waters

Maverick cop Jolly Macken goes looking for a killer, but accidentally starts a war

Fiction | History
104% funded
324 supporters
Edits in progress

Publication date: TBC

Support this project
The crowd has spoken – Blackwatertown is happening. Pre-order your reward now.
$15 
76 pledges

Digital

eBook edition and your name in the back of the book
Choose this reward
$20  + shipping
139 pledges

Paperback Patron

1st edition paperback, eBook edition and your name in the back of the book.
Choose this reward
$30  + shipping
67 pledges

Super Patron Paperback

1st edition paperback, eBook edition and your name in the list of Super Patrons in the front of the book.
Choose this reward
$50  + shipping
20 pledges

Read With A Friend

2 x 1st edition paperbacks, eBook with two names in Super Patrons list in front of book
Choose this reward
$100  + shipping
12 pledges

5 Book Bundle

5 x 1st edition paperbacks, eBook with up to 5 names in Super Patrons list in front of book
Choose this reward
$105  + shipping

Walking Book Club

Paul will meet you in a suitable location in or near south Bucks or London (or Belfast by special arrangement) for a walking book club. Enjoy some nature or riverside while discussing the book and other questions you may have. Up to 4 copies of the 1st edition paperback, eBook edition and your names in the list of Super Patrons in the front of the book. Up to 4 people.
Choose this reward
$135  + shipping
5 pledges

Book Club 10 Copy Bundle

10 x 1st edition paperbacks, eBook with up to ten names in Super Patrons list in front of book
Choose this reward
$135  + shipping
1 pledge

Be a podcast/radio show guest with the author

Star as a guest on the We’d Like A Word podcast and radio show presented by Paul Waters and fellow writer Stevyn Colgan. Join our conversation about books, writing, publishing and everything about words. Tell us about your favourite book or the writing that changed your life – be it prose, poetry, script, song lyrics or something else entirely. Plus everything from Super Patron Paperback level. (Only 2 available.)
Choose this reward
$135  + shipping
1 pledge

Paradise Lost Cream Tea

Exclusive out of hours visit to Milton’s Cottage in Chalfont St Giles, the home of literary giant John Milton, where he wrote Paradise Lost. With cream tea and talk from the author. Plus everything from Super Patron Paperback level.
Choose this reward
$165  + shipping
1 pledge

Literary tour of south Bucks with the author

Join me for a special tour of literary sites in south Bucks, taking in literary locations, where famous writers lived and drank. And we’ll have a drink ourselves in one of my favourite pubs to round things off. Plus everything from Super Patron Paperback level.
Choose this reward
$200  + shipping

Book Club Visit

10x first edition paperbacks and up to ten names in the list of Super Patrons at the front of the book. Plus author reading/Q&A for private / book clubs (in the south Bucks or London areas or further afield including Ireland by special arrangement)
Choose this reward
$265  + shipping

Lunch with the author

Join Paul for lunch in south Bucks or London where you can talk about Blackwatertown, writing, reading or life in general. (Locations in Belfast or elsewhere in Ireland may be available by special arrangement.) Plus everything from Super Patron Level.
Choose this reward

Sold out!

$20  + shipping
20 pledges

Super Patron Paperback (EARLY BIRD)

1st edition paperback, eBook edition and your name in the list of Super Patrons in the front of the book. EARLY BIRD price, only 20 available.
$135  + shipping
2 pledges

Name A Character

Name a character (one female character, one male character available) in Blackwatertown in consultation with the author. Plus everything from Super Patron Paperback level. (Only 2 available.)
$135  + shipping
1 pledge

Name A Canine Character

That’s right! You could name the daring dog that threatens to derail a political career. Plus everything from Super Patron Paperback level. (Only 1 available.)

Frequently Asked Questions

Where can I get my book delivered to?

We deliver to most countries worldwide. Enter your delivery address during checkout and we'll display the shipping cost when we know where to send your book.

How do supporter names work?

Every person who pledges to help to make a book gets their name included in a supporter section as a thank you. If you want to add a different name, this can be changed in your account after you have completed your pledge.

Still have a question? Visit our Help Centre to find out more.

Police sergeant Jolly Macken finds it hard to tell his friends from his enemies. When he’s banished to the quiet Irish border village of Blackwatertown, Macken vows to find out who killed the man he’s replacing – even if it turns out to be another officer. But a lot can happen in a week. Over seven days Macken falls in love with the bewitchingly beautiful Aoife, uncovers family secrets, accidentally starts a war and is hailed a hero and hounded as a traitor.

Macken has always had trouble fitting in. As a Catholic, he’s viewed with suspicion by the rest of the mainly Protestant police force. But as a policeman, he’s isolated from his fellow Catholics because he serves the British Crown. When Blackwatertown explodes into violence, who can Macken trust? Which side should he take? Are anyone’s hands clean – even his own? And is betrayal the only way to survive?

The story is set around the fictionalised village of Blackwatertown, which sits in lush countryside on the centuries-old border between Elizabethan and Irish-controlled Ireland and not far from today’s Irish border – currently featuring in its own Brexit drama. The action takes place during a little-known IRA insurgency in the 1950s. The intertwining of fact and fiction is based on murky episodes from Ireland’s past and the author’s own family history. Blackwatertown’s initial sense of calm foreshadows the current uneasy peace in Northern Ireland.

Blackwatertown has been described as LA Confidential meets The Guard. Legendary thriller writer Frederick Forsyth, author of The Day of the Jackal, says Blackwatertown is “a fascinating story with intricate twists and turns” and that Macken’s “position as a Catholic police officer in hardline Unionist RUC is extremely intriguing.” BBC Radio 4 presenter Rev Richard Coles describes Blackwatertown as “extraordinary, abundant, dazzling and full of incident.” Leading BBC journalist and Northern Ireland expert Peter Taylor said Blackwatertown is “engaging and reads really well.” Readers have described Blackwatertown as “exciting”, “moving” and “funny”, and they identify so strongly with the leading characters, that their responses range from “it made me cry” to “it made me want to punch you in the face!” (Please don’t, Barry.)

Support this project

Quick select rewards

$20  + shipping
139 pledges

Paperback Patron

1st edition paperback, eBook edition and your name in the back of the book.
Choose this reward
$15 
76 pledges

Digital

eBook edition and your name in the back of the book
Choose this reward
  • Paul Waters avatar

    Paul Waters

    Paul Waters is an award-winning BBC producer. He grew up in Belfast during “the Troubles”, was involved in cross-community peace groups and went on to report and produce for BBC Northern Ireland, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC World Service and Channel 5.


    His main claim to fame is making Pelé his dinner. But Paul has also covered elections in the USA, created an alternative G8 Summit in a South African township, gone undercover in Zimbabwe, conducted football crowds, reported from Swiss drug shooting-up rooms, smuggled a satellite dish into Cuba to produce the first BBC live programmes from the island and overseen the World Service’s first live coverage of the 9/11 attacks on America.


    Paul has also taught in Poland, driven a cab in England, busked in Wales, been a night club cook in New York, designed computer systems in Dublin, presented podcasts for Germans and organised music festivals for beer drinkers. He currently presents a book and writers podcast called We’d Like A Word. He lives in Buckinghamshire and has two teenage children.

  • SUNDAY: Sergeant Jolly Macken didn’t want to be a policeman anymore. He felt hot despite the cool air of the Mourne foothills. The butt of his hand pressed on the polished handle of his baton, not yet drawn. He hated his job. He hated the crowd pushing at his back. He hated the string of men blocking the road ahead. All of them impatient for his signal – the ones behind muttering his nickname. He hated the verbal albatross that had been hung round his neck too. Jolly. Christ!

    The stony slopes of fern and heather and gorse would usually lift his heart. The open land a refuge from complication and regulation. He’d feel the tension ebb from his shoulders. The small smile that would quietly creep over his face, unwitnessed. If Macken believed in anything, it was that there was no better place nor way for a man to be at peace than by quiet water, with a rod and line. Alone, but never lonely.

    Today was different. Today he was only a hard-faced big man trapped inside a uniform. A stone bounced past his feet. The serenity of this County Down emptiness had been shattered long before. But at this moment of decision, all the shouting and jeering, the drums and the fifes, seemed to fade to silence in Macken’s mind. The violence was about to begin – the striking out at head and body with stone and bar and baton and rifle butt. And he was going to be the one to start it.

    Read more...
  • 3rd December 2019 Comical, cool, dark and punches you in the gut

     The answer: They're both comical, cool, dark and punch you in the gut. The question: What do Muhammed Ali and my book Blackwatertown have in common?

    That's according to Northern Irish writer and crime fiction reviewer Gerard Brennan - author of Disorder. In his DisorderGB podcast, Gerard says this about Blackwatertown:

    It's comical at the start. Really cool writing quality and a really nice…

    1st November 2019 Running past the finish line

    You already know that, thanks to you, Blackwatertown is 100% funded. But, like Rhasidat Adeleke (winning the 100m Final at the European Youth Olympic Festival in Baku in July - one of her two gold medals there for Ireland), we've sprinted past the 100% with extra supporters piling in to bring the funding level to 104%. So  I have some new people to thank and also a major update for you on Blackwatertown…

    27th September 2019 Blackwatertown is 100% funded thanks to you...

    100% Phew! The pictures are from the final push over the line. Top right corner, that’s old mate Su in local shop and community support Yaldens, with Matthew Yalden himself. They’ve backed Blackwatertown and helped spread the word. They sent me a thumbs up for 100%.

    And that’s Parmjit Singh of Kashi House publishers, sitting where John Milton dictated Paradise Lost. Parmjit has been a great support…

    19th September 2019 The craic was ninety (per cent)

    Loitering in the street, trying to persuade passersby to back my book Blackwatertown, could be a daunting prospect. But it can't be as daunting as trying to sell Peace By Peace round estates in Belfast when I was teenager, surely? (One friend in the Peace People had it particularly hard. With a beard, he ressembled Gerry Adams - a risky look in some parts of the city. Without it, he was the spit of…

    15th September 2019 Word of mouth to 85%

    Blackwatertown is nearly to 100%. And yes, as the sign suggests, it really does exist. Though my version is fictionalised and set in the 1950s.

    The reason I’ve reached 85% is because I asked a small number of generous people who had already supported Blackwatertown, not to back me again, but to think of one person they knew who might consider supporting the book and pre-ordering a copy. And then…

    9th September 2019 We've reached the 80s

    Our last update was at two thirds funded and I was waiting to hit three quarters before I got in touch again. But we've smashed through that to more than four fifths - 81% to be precise. And it's all because of y-y-y-you. (Max Headroom? Anybody?)

    I've been spreading the word about Blackwatertown in various places - including on Mens Radio with host Kenny "the Man Whisperer" Mammarella-D'Cruz. An…

    7th August 2019 Blackwatertown two thirds of the way there

    Brilliant Beryl (that's her in the red) has taken Blackwatertown to two thirds of the way to being funded - thank you Beryl Lewis. I'm feeling optimistic!

    And thanks too to renowned musician Layil Barr. I was hoping to add a video of her performing with MilLuna, but this website has defeated me. You'll find some here http://milunamusic.com/media/  Go see them if you have a chance. (You can get…

    15th July 2019 60 plus: I don't want to die in big knickers...

    I've finally reached the spritely 60+ level - that's percentage funding for Blackwatertown I'm talking about, thank you very much. And of course it's all thanks to you, dear supporters. And I'm honoured and privileged that among you is Karen from The Twisted Sisters band - see video. They're always irreverently lively live performers, usually in Ireland. If you get the chance, go see them. I did in…

    8th June 2019 Royal thanks

    That's King George VI on the left, in naval uniform. He looks a bit starstruck. No wonder, when you realise he's walking beside the celebrated RUC District Inspector Michael Murphy - aka Great Uncle Mike - of B District. (On the right in the dark uniform.)

    I'm sharing the picture with you to mark you taking my book Blackwatertown to 50% funding. Halfway to making the Unbound publishing and…

    29th May 2019 It started with a cyst, never thought it would come to this...

    The oddest things can bring people together. That's my mate Su Verhoeven in the top right corner, with the green hair. She was talking to people around the world - her "Lovelies" via her YouTube channel. Su's a sharing type of person, and when a huge stubborn cyst grew on her back, boy did she share the gruesome details. But people didn't wince and turn away, they flocked to her videos. Tens of millions…

    27th May 2019 On the platform

    When you get a platform, it's good to give a platform. The Chiltern Chatter website and newsletter kindly gave me a platform to talk about my book Blackwatertown and asked me to talk about my favourite places. So I'm celebrating some businesses local to me - giving them a platform. It's helps that the people there are universally gorgeous - see pic of Tom behind the bar of the Jolly Cricketers (or…

    22nd May 2019 Seamus Heaney and me

    The poetry of the late Seamus Heaney is one of the inspirations for Blackwatertown. I saw and heard him chat and read his poetry a few times in Belfast and London - and then celebrate Ted Hughes at his memorial service at Westminster Abbey. There's a special centre all about him in Bellaghy now, and famous Seamus has all sorts of famous poems. I love his work, but it's Bye-Child that has particular…

    20th May 2019 Now for the hard part...

    Thank you all for taking Blackwatertown to 31 per cent in under a week. The boffins at Unbound (the publisher) say that books reaching 30 per cent funding in 30 days are set fair to succeed. So we're smashing it.

    But now for the hard part. I'm feeling the love from all of you who have pledged to support the book and have shared on social media and told other people. The next 69 per cent will be…

    16th May 2019 Murphy and Princess Elizabeth

    The main man in Blackwatertown, Jolly Macken, is a demoted RUC sergeant in the 1950s. But sure what on earth would I know about that, a young strip like myself? Fair question. I wasn't around then, nor ever in the RUC. But I know some who were. Relations like the fine fella in the picture. It was a bit of a dangerous family tradition.

    There was no difficulty finding gunmen back in the day. Swordsmen…

    14th May 2019 Doggone it! What a ten per center of a first day...

    Going live on something new can be daunting, even with Unbound rooting for you. Not everything goes right. For instance, my very first backer sent me the money for the first paperback directly, rather than through the website. So, when I lodged it, my name showed up on the list of supporters instead of his. Sorry about that Stan Burridge, official back number one.

    Even with Stan's early backing…

  • These people are helping to fund Blackwatertown.

    User avatar

    John Colgan

    User avatar

    Melanie Kimble

    User avatar

    Mike Hickman

    User avatar

    Fergal Ryan

    User avatar

    Lesley Crooks

    User avatar

    Dino Sofos

    User avatar

    Helen Foster

    User avatar

    Lia Baker Perera

    User avatar

    Helen Conchar

    User avatar

    Peter Orton

    User avatar

    Richard hazell

    User avatar

    Mark Marmur

    User avatar

    Megan Bonhomme

    User avatar

    Sally Powell

    User avatar

    Sean Prior

    User avatar

    Carlo Navato

    User avatar

    Terry Bergin

    User avatar

    Alan powell

    User avatar

    Paul Waters

    User avatar

    June MacMahon

    User avatar

    Nick Sharwood

    User avatar

    john Murphy

    View more
  • Helen Jones
    Helen Jones asked:

    Loving the book excerpts. Intrigued by the author profile- tell us more about Pele!

    Paul Waters
    Paul Waters replied:

    Hi Helen - Once upon a time I was working as a cook in a New York nightclub and restaurant. A small foreign black guy came in. Nobody was particularly interested in him. It was all white US young men and women doing front-of-house roles. The guest looked like he had a small football up his top. Otherwise pretty trim. So far, so unremarkable as far as anyone was concerned. In fact, they were less interested in him than in the other customers. Until we spotted him. We being the two Irish and two El Salvadorean staff behind the scenes, out of sight of the authorities - doing most of the work. At first it was - what!? No! can't be! It is! Out we burst from behind the scenes to say hello to Pelé. The rest of the staff looking askance at us, surprised we'd risk being spotted - our working status being a moot point. It's said that you should never meet your heroes, because they'll inevitably be a disappointment. I haven't found that. Pelé was friendly, enthusiastic, gracious. A lovely guy. We talked, larked about, had photographs - to the bemusement of the crowd around us. Football/soccer didn't loom so large in north American imaginations back in those days. They're catching up with the rest of the world now. Eventually we let Pelé get on with his evening and I made him his tea - or dinner - or whatever you call an evening meal in New York, when it's in a nightclub restaurant. What did he have? I'm guessing seafood chowder. It was an honour and a pleasure to feed the second best footballer the world has ever seen. The best? That would be George, of course. I'm from Belfast.