Updates

'Please grip this fact with your cerebral tentacle...'

Monday, 25 September 2017

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My short story 'The Doll and His Maker' was first published in MX Publishing's Sherlock's Home: The Empty House (2012). This collection, supervised by Steve Emecz and the BBC Sherlock fansite Sherlockology, was published to raise funds for the campaign to save one of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's most important properties from what seemed certain destruction. Undershaw was where Doyle wrote some of…

The Continuity Girl is nearly here...

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

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Today I completed the final tweaks to the copy edit of The Continuity Girl and sent the manuscript to my copy editor, Andrew Chapman. It took tremendous self-control not to go on making changes. I once heard David Almond, the acclaimed children's writer, read from his much-loved novel Skellig, and admit afterwards that he'd edited as he'd read. The book was then over 10 years old. 

All that's left…

When Sherlock Holmes fought the Nazis

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

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There's an east wind coming all the same, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter, Watson, and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.

So says Sherlock Holmes at the end of 'The Last Bow', the story in which Conan Doyle brought…

1969 and all that...

Friday, 11 August 2017

Moon module

There seems to be some consensus that the sixties didn’t begin in 1960. The void in vital pop music that followed the US Army buzz-clipping Elvis Presley’s hard edges away, and the crash of the Beechcraft Bonanza carrying Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper, wasn’t filled properly until the emergence of The Beatles as a worldwide force in 1963. The contraceptive pill might have been…

From Dr Finlay to Downton Abbey: a short history of Sunday night nostalgia

Sunday, 4 June 2017

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20 July 1969. You sit down at 6 pm and turn on your television set…

No wait, that’s not right. I’ll start again. These details matter. 

20 July 1969. You have to turn on your television set first, then sit down. You’ve had the set a few years, so it takes time for the tube to warm up and for the image to appear on the convex screen. There’s a distinctive smell when you’re close…

All's Fair in Love and Monster Hunting; or a Gift to the Three-quarters

Thursday, 1 June 2017

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Here's another excerpt, available only to those who have already pledged. The campaign is reaching the end of its initial phase, but the progress has been wonderful and I fully expect to hit the target sometime in the next few weeks. 

Look out over the next couple of days for a video interview shot at Big Comfy Bookshop in Coventry by my good friend Alex Breeze. In it, I play the part of…

Sherlock's Muse, or A Gift to the Thirty-Percenters

Monday, 29 May 2017

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30% in 17 days - that's really remarkable! To thank you and to celebrate, here's a second excerpt from The Continuity Girl, posted as an exclusive for those whose names will appear in the list of patrons in the finished book.

This time we're in 2014, not 1969. Gemma MacDonald, a London-based Film Studies lecturer, has been tasked with introducing the newly-restored version of The Private Life of…

Billy Wilder, Sherlock Holmes, and the 'never-out-of-fashion franchise': an interview with Kim Newman

Sunday, 14 May 2017

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Kim Newman is one of those beasts we're encouraged to think of as mythical: a critic who is also an artist. 

As film critic, Kim is author of a definitive history of modern horror, Nightmare Movies (1988, revised and expanded 2011). But Kim's love of film and TV extends beyond horror, as is evident from the range of his reviews for film journals such as Sight and Sound and Empire, and…

Sherlock and the Sexual Revolution: Holmes on screen in the 1960s

Tuesday, 18 April 2017

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Photographer unknown. Courtesy Paul Diamond collection. On location for The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes. Left to right in foreground: I.A.L. Diamond, Colin Blakely, Geneviève Page, Robert Stephens, Billy Wilder.

Perhaps the most ’60s thing to happen to Sherlock Holmes was the 1966 poster for James Hill’s 1965 thriller A Study in Terror. Below the say-it-like-it-is tagline, ‘SHERLOCK…

A short blog about a single illustration

Saturday, 15 April 2017

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I love this illustration by the American Holmes illustrator, Frederic Dorr Steele, which I borrowed for a Twitter post. It was created for his first Sherlock Holmes cover, for the edition of Collier's that contained the detective's apparent return from the dead in "The Empy House". The composition is superb: Holmes's left leg and arm (down to the knuckle of his forefinger) push him away from the…

The man who found Sherlock’s Monster: an interview with Adrian Shine

Monday, 10 April 2017

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A year ago, in April 2016, a momentous discovery was made in the depths of Loch Ness. Newspapers displayed a sonar image, collected by a state-of-the-art autonomous submersible, that was unmistakably monstrous—and not only because it was rendered in lurid green, blue and brown striations. There was its thick body, there its slender, curving neck. The mystery of Loch Ness had been solved!

Well…

An Interview with the author of THE CONTINUITY GIRL Part 2

Sunday, 19 March 2017

As promised, here's the second part of the interview that was shot at the Big Comfy Bookshop in Coventry by Alex Breeze, with Heather Kincaid asking the questions. 

This time I talk about how I chose my main characters, what inspired the plot, and what the novel has to say (if anything) about those things that are going on in the world just now. 

Thank you for your enthusiastic response to the…

An Interview with the author of THE CONTINUITY GIRL Part 1

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

Here, as promised, is the first part of the interview shot by Alex Breeze at Coventry's Big Comfy Bookshop. Questions courtesy of Heather Kincaid. 

2016 and all that...

Sunday, 26 February 2017

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August, 2013. The Heather Centre wasn’t a scheduled stop on our tour of the Highlands. In fact, we only really sought it out to add a punchline to a joke we hadn’t quite formulated. My wife’s name is Heather, you see, and we were on honeymoon. We were in the mood to be easily amused.

The stop did make sense in another way. We had spent the morning at the RSPB reserve at Lake Garten, looking…

Coffee at midnight with Christopher Lee: an interview with Robert McPhee

Sunday, 5 February 2017

Mycroft

A coach clatters towards the ruins of a castle in the near dusk, pulled by four white horses. A couple of liveried men—a coachman and a footman—are at the front, and another stands behind. Two more liveried men trot in their wake, on another pair of white horses. Above the clop of hooves and rattle of wheels we just about recognise the theme from Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake—but it’s been Elgarized…

Patrick Kincaid commented on this blog post.

Difficulties with 'Girls' - some further thoughts on a trend in book titles.

Sunday, 29 January 2017

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When I first decided to call my novel The Continuity Girl, it wasn’t to follow a popular formula. There were reasons the title seemed right, some of which I will explain below, and others of which are best left up to you. Then, a few months ago—and just as I was beginning my first revision, so was open to suggestion—I had a crisis about it.

It’s that word ‘girl’. The age of my novel’s title…

Lakes and Castles: on location with THE CONTINUITY GIRL. #1 – Loch Meiklie

Thursday, 22 December 2016

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The way to the bank is thick with birches. There’s hardly any space between the silvery trunks, and its worse nearer the water, where there are also alders to contend with. Then, when I’m within a few feet of the place I’m looking for, I’m stymied by the depth of Loch Meiklie. None of this—not the trees nor the high water—had been here when Holmes, Watson and Madame Valladon were enjoying their picnic…

A novel that sprang to life in a moment of inspiration. After forty years...

Sunday, 11 December 2016

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One of ways I kept my writing going over the past couple of years was by watching, reading and listening to others discuss the way they created things.

It didn't have to be novelists. I was just as happy watching the artist Frank Quitely compose a panel for a comic book, or listening to Adam Buxton and Graham Linehan discuss the discipline of writing comedy, as I was tuning in to a Mariella Frostrup…

Getting ready for print
Publication date: Autumn 2017
103% funded
214 backers