The Coming Spring and Summer of Imagination

Thursday, 5 April 2018

I thought a quick progress report on The Coming Age of Imagination would be in order. 

The pledges are coming in at a steady rate.  I've been working through my database of contacts and each batch I send out gets a new wave of either pledges or promises to pledge.  I have a few corporate clients I plan to approach when we are closer to the target.

I've been interviewed for an article about UBI and the theatre, which I'll share when published.  I've also submitted a couple of article synopsis to various magazines.  More on that soon.  I have set up a Facebook page for the book and I am making regular use of Linked In and Twitter to keep nudging those potential pledgers.

I'm talking at Tug Life in London on the 12th June.  I'm also trying to squeeze onto the bill at a literary festival in Sussex in August.  If anyone knows of any other speaking opps please shout.

In terms of writing, I have a full draft of the book on the table.  It has three sections, two of which are moving parts in the sense that there are a constant stream of AI and automation stories coming out while there are UBI projects developing across the globe.  Once I have reached my target I will do a thorough redraft, working in updates and latest news. 

The third and main section will be about the power of creativity unleashed in the world.   Some of that is sociological - cities transformed by art - some psychological - people finding new purpose - and some environmental - isn't wasteful consumerism just misdirected creativity? I've also been getting into descriptions of  what creativity actually feels like.  I find this fascinating.

Frederic Myers talked of uprushes from the subliminal mind.  Many artists talk of the creative spririt flowing through them and onto the page, like they are merely a conducting rod.  I've not long finished reading The Last Days of New Paris by China Mieville.  Like a lot of Mielville's books it is built around a very vivid concept.  In this case, surrealist works of art come to life to fight nazis in occupied Paris. They were brought to life by an S-Event (Surrealist?  Situationist? Subliminal? A random event to define us?) triggered by a release of subliminal energy.  That energy had been captured in a battery by a rocket scientist called Jack Parsons. Parsons attended a game of exquisite corpse (Consequences) played by Andre Breton and other surrealists.  As the artists draw and pass the paper around, Jack turns on his machine and starts capturing their energy.  "The artists laughed.  The needles on the guages swung as Parson's battery filled.  He could feel energies coiling out of these heads, these drawings, this room, into his wires." 

I love this imagining of creativity as an energy like electricity.  I think I might like to find some very creative people and ask them to describe how it feels to them.

An unexpected side effect of seeking pledges is that I have reconnected with so many of you.  I will get all those promised coffees into my diary over the next few weeks.

Thanks for reading and please share this with your friends.  The exponential power of networks will make mincemeat of this crowdfunding malarkey :)

 

Phil

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