Saving Bletchley Park - New Covers! But which one should we choose?

Thursday, 16 April 2015

New covers are in!! Unbound have been working on the front cover for Saving Bletchley Park and have just sent me through the most recent three along with the first two. After looking at them all for a few minutes I've got a clear favourite, but I'd love to know what you think. We will be having a meeting next week to discuss the covers so I'd love to get your feedback before then. Which do you like best and why? I've added in the editors comments about the covers which give a bit of background on why certain features were chosen. 

This was the first cover we ever designed! This was also when the emphasis of the book was much more on the Bletchley campaign, and social media. We knew that such an important part of the story was that Bletchley saved Britain, so the concept was to marry social media (connections), patriotic symbols (the Union Jack hinted at in the background), and an element of secret code (Enigma style keys).

Later on the focus of the book became more complex. Sue now had a contextual narrative strand running through it, with a rich background of historical detail. Now we began to think, wouldn't it be interesting if the cover conveyed the stark difference between those two worlds – Bletchley in the twentieth century and the decidedly twenty-first century campaign which came full circle and preserved it for years to come? So on the left hand side we have a Wren on her bike, who contrasts with her much more techy counterpart. 

We took this idea down a more graphic route to see what would happen when we contrasted the keys of the Enigma machine with a modern-day keyboard. We loved the round shapes of the keys on the left hand side and that very distinctive typography. 

We liked the circular keys so much that we developed the idea of circles – concentric circles? Circles revealing secret images behind? The circular nature of the campaign? It feels very fitting. Here is one of the most recent cover roughs – we are playing with the idea of using some very iconic photos (that's Bletchley itself in the background, and Alan Turing in the sepia photo), but in a way that suggests a language we don't quite understand; the intrigue and secrecy surrounding the code-breaking that went on at Bletchley during the war. 

So, it's over to you, which do you prefer and why? Or do you have a better idea?  We will be deciding soon which cover to use and would love your feedback to help us decide.

Thank very much :)

Sue x

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Comments

Stuart Witts
Stuart Witts says:

I very much like the idea of the contrast between the two worlds but don't think the existing examples convey this particularly clearly. However, the progression onto using the circular keys in the last cover example definitely feels like the way to go.

April 16, 2015

Janice Staines
Janice Staines says:

I like the third example best (contrast of past and present) although I think the figures in the illustration would benefit from some redrafting. I'm not sure the current illustrations exactly exemplify the wrens who worked at Bletchly and the 'modern' figure certainly doesn't suggest a 'techy counterpart' to me.

April 16, 2015

Niki Holmes-Bridges
Niki Holmes-Bridges says:

Personally I like the wren on her bike, but the concentric circles is also good.

April 16, 2015

Paul Smith
Paul Smith says:

The contrast between two worlds one is a nice idea, especially down to using period relevant fonts across the two era's. However I really like the final one with the circles on it but that might be because I always think everything looks better in black and white or sepia! I suspect, having a picture of Alan Turing on it will be a good draw when the second print run is on a shelf / display stand in Foyles - recognisability and inference of topic and story at a distance I imagine will help sales.

April 16, 2015

Mark Wilson
Mark Wilson says:

I actually like the first one (the red one) and the last one but with one major caveat - cutting Turing's face in three doesn't seem to work for me... I think it needs more work, but the concept is sound. Definitely not the Apple/Enigma keyboard one... Apple doesn't belong in this context...

April 16, 2015

michael harris
michael harris says:

I like the 5th one, but not just Alan Turing's image should be used. Also maybe use a less well known Alan Turing image could be used.
PS can I nominate Jean Valentine as one?

April 16, 2015

Stefan Paetow
Stefan Paetow says:

Hmmmm... I liked the Union Jack one, but the Enigma vs Mac cover works for me too. The last one is good, but I wouldn't chop Turing's photo like that but find other images related to Bletchley... put a photo in each concentric circle, so you have Turing in one, the Enigma keys in another, a Wren in a third, perhaps an image of a Bombe or Colossus in a fourth, something else and then 'Sue Black' in the sixth? ;-)

April 16, 2015

Mark Hillary
Mark Hillary says:

The original red one or the keyboard :-)

April 16, 2015

Garrett Coakley
Garrett Coakley says:

I think the last one is definitely the right approach, but I agree that having Turing's face chopped up like that is very odd looking. Different images would work.

April 16, 2015

Casper de Weerd
Casper de Weerd says:

I like the last one best, however cannot you arrange the Turing picture in such a way that you see parts of one whole photo through the various circles. Furthermore you might have the circles have a more Bombe like appearance

April 16, 2015

Dave Russell
Dave Russell says:

I prefer the last cover. It has a mystique about it , and conveys the overall theme in my very humble opinion.

April 16, 2015

Collette Curry
Collette Curry says:

I prefer the wren on the bike one. It's a great contrast with the graphics and colour scheme.

April 16, 2015

Bernard Golden
Bernard Golden says:

Prefer blue original one. Very strong and easy to comprehend topic of book.

April 16, 2015

Sietske van Vugt
Sietske van Vugt says:

I also prefer the last one, but agree with previous commenters about it needing a bit of work like using a few different images and/or using another Turing photo.

April 16, 2015

Sharon Moore
Sharon Moore says:

My favourites are the first, red one, and then the fourth with the contrasting keyboards. The last one is just a little too broken up for me. Like a few others, if Alan Turing's face was not split up it might be higher in my preferences.

April 16, 2015

Simon Thompson
Simon Thompson says:

The concentric circles, please! Looking forward to reading it … BR, Simon

April 16, 2015

Seb Schmoller
Seb Schmoller says:

I think #4 has by far the most impact and clarity, and that #3 has the nicest tone, though it needs a lot of attention typographically, and the figure on the right hand side of the page is inexplicable (to me at any rate).

April 16, 2015

Simon Tyldesley
Simon Tyldesley says:

Hi, I like all the designs, but if I had to pick one the third (old/new) has it, just. It's what's the books all about.

April 16, 2015

Mary Reid
Mary Reid says:

I do like the two keyboards back to back - simple, graphic and explicit. The final design is much too fussy - there's too much going on - and indecipherable (!) to anyone who doesn't recognise the photo of Turing.

April 16, 2015

Paul Lorton Jr
Paul Lorton Jr says:

I also like all the designs. From top to bottom, the first 2 are attention getting but don't tell the story as explicitly as #5 or #3 which, in order, a rev my favorites. #4 speaks to me but not so much about Bletchley. In any case, thanks for this fun opportunity and I do totally defer to the author and publisher.

April 16, 2015

Hugh Varilly
Hugh Varilly says:

I prefer the third one - the person on the bike. Good covers shouldn't be too cluttered or fussy, so that's why I prefer that one. Also, the cover does tell you a bit about what the book's about.

April 16, 2015

William Bates
William Bates says:

If you use either the red or Union Jack two-keyboard covers, clearly the keys on one keyboard should be scrambled at random. Cypher machine, remember?
Last cover is too hard to read, IMHO. Doubling size of everything might help.

April 16, 2015

Mark Gamble
Mark Gamble says:

I like the last one!

April 16, 2015

Edgar Toro
Edgar Toro says:

I like the one with the two contrasting keyboards (#4), but still my favourite is #2 with the Union Jack. #3 doesn't communicate the crypto / tech theme. #4 breaks visual continuity, hard to read.

April 16, 2015

Alan Jones
Alan Jones says:

The fourth of the five, the contrasting keyboards, is my favourite followed by the third. Dislike the use of flags, and don't think emphasising Turing is for the best.

April 16, 2015

Jill Goulder
Jill Goulder says:

I do love Wren-on-a-bike, though that's perhaps because I'm female and have a bike (and would love to have worked at Bletchley); I do think it delivers the clearest message as to what the book is about, though would need tinkering with, e.g. the figure on the right certainly needs changing. Commentator Paul Smith has a good point about Turing being a draw at present, but as with others I don't like seeing his face chopped up, and find the image hard to look at generally - though this is how images targeted at young people are treated these days, so it would be worth seeing what young commentators think. (I am 62!) The bombe arrangement of the circles suggested by Casper de Weerd might be good. As for the two keyboards, all very neat but as Paul Lorton Jr says, it doesn't say 'Bletchley' to me. Hope that's useful.

April 16, 2015

Sue Black
Sue Black says:

Wow! Thank you all so much for your wonderful feedback. We will be taking all your views into account at our meeting next week

April 16, 2015

Mark Vent
Mark Vent says:

I like either the Black and White ... or the two keyboards ones :) can't decide which - will be happy to receive the book no matter the cover (I don't judge the proverbial by the proverbial :D )

April 16, 2015

Sean Harkin
Sean Harkin says:

Ok, here's my tuppence worth, It has to be the first one; for the following reasons. Firstly, a bright Red front cover will grab peoples attention in a books store (and online) then you notice the Large white writing which contrasts very well with the red. Then you see the Qwerty Keyboards and the relationship that it is an Enigma machine then you see the Union Flag in the back ground. So the four visual items really grabs you; well, it grabbed me.

April 16, 2015

Johanna Wilson
Johanna Wilson says:

I love the first and last ones although it looks very strange that the photo circles of Turing don't match up.

April 16, 2015

Michael Fuller
Michael Fuller says:

Definitely prefer the first Union Jack cover. If you have to use the circles cover please don't use the Turing image. He was only one of 10,000 and including the image only serves to distort the focus from everyone who played a part in BP's success.

April 16, 2015

William Bonwitt
William Bonwitt says:

I agree with those who prefer the last one but with some adjustment to the Turing photo.

April 16, 2015

Jacky Dols
Jacky Dols says:

Still like the red one and the last one best!
With one comment for the last one, I have to agree with Michael Harris's comment about it being Alan Turing's face on the cover. Lost of people contributed to the successes accomplished at BP and I agree that it shouldn't only be Alan Turing ( although most known name associated with BP ) on the cover. Due love the background photo. Maybe a picture of The Bombe could be included?

April 16, 2015

Matthew Searle
Matthew Searle says:

I'm not keen on the red ones, or the keyboards (the yellow dot makes it look like it should say "half price" rather than the title and author.

Not keen on the way that some of the letters on the last one fade into the background (the edge of the last "G" in "SAVING" for example).

So - favourite design is the second one.

April 16, 2015

John Schoenbaum
John Schoenbaum says:

I agree with Mark Hilary. Original red one or keyboard. Thanks.

April 16, 2015

simon rae
simon rae says:

All the designs have some nice aspects and I particularly like the big red (1st) one and the cycling wren one ... but then I asked myself what is the book about , and how can that be illustrated? From what I remember, between '45 and the mid 70s most people in the UK knew nothing about BP or the work that had been done there and any one that did know (from MoD staff, IT pioneers, coders, operators, cooks or cleaners) didn't talk about it. When the gags loosened the whole place was in a sorry state of repair and it took a lot of very hard work to get it to its present saved state.

Is there any way the misguided secrecy that contributed to the loss of BP in the first place be implied in the cover? Maybe a gagged face? A photo of Turing with a hand over his mouth? A row of faces (possibly with uniform caps/hats) with the mouths photo-shopped out ... but also with an image representing the 'saved BP', one of the new buildings perhaps, or a plaque or statue.

April 16, 2015

Sarah Borne
Sarah Borne says:

I like the last one best.

April 16, 2015

Ellen Spertus
Ellen Spertus says:

I like the ideas in the final one but find it too visually challenging. There's a lot to like about 1 and 2, but 4 may combine the best visuals with the ideas.

April 16, 2015

Lee Mauger
Lee Mauger says:

Using current Apple design elements (the iPad button in the 3rd example and the Apple keyboard in the 4th) will date the book cover horribly over time (limiting its shelf life), and I would argue it is already dated (doesn't sing modern world to me). If I saw this in a shop without context I'd assume it was a book about the history of Apple. Limits your target market (excludes me, who helped fund the book...).
Also, while I like the circular buttons, this wasn't Turing's invention, or an invention at Bletchley Park, so I think you should be careful to not make this look like a book about the Enigma machine, Bletchley and Turing's work was so much more important to the world.
I think the first (maybe second) and last covers shown would work, the others I feel strongly would be detrimental to the great work you've done in telling a broad, timeless story.
As a test I asked my kids (age 5 and 7) what they thought the covers were telling them. The first and second cover they said 'its a secret code', the third they said 'it's about day and night', the fourth they said 'it was about keyboards', the fifth they said 'it's like a puzzle with a man in it'.

April 16, 2015

Dorothy Birtalan
Dorothy Birtalan says:

I like the first (blue union jack); and the idea of the last one. Changes I would suggest to the latter - not to chop up Turing's face, have it be in one of the 3 circles, have the Wren on a bicycle in one of the circles, have a pic of the Big Machine (or women at desks) or something period and relevant in the third circle. I don't like the old/new keyboard b/c the new keyboard is clearly an Apple Mac and that pulls the focus away from the subject. A 1990s modern generic keyboard...maybe. Keep at it. You'll get something better!

April 16, 2015

Andrew Szkuta
Andrew Szkuta says:

The "Wren on Bike" cover does it for me - it is the simplest, but as well reflects best the theme of the book. However (a) I would not have the font changing with the background colour change - it's not easy on the eye, and (b) whatever is the "modern" Wren doing? Callisthenics? She probably needs a re-think.

All the others seem to be over-designed: the message gets lost in cleverness for its own sake and over complexity - added to which the rather bitty Turing cover (the least successful for me) doesn't even have the author's name! And as someone else has pointed out, the yellow half-price sticker on the keyboards cover is a real howler.

April 16, 2015

Craig Vaughton
Craig Vaughton says:

I liked the originals, but the third version wins it for me, I like the old/new contrast and it says exactly what the book is about. Not so sure about the graphic in the new half though, how about a more modern bike design? The Enigma/Mac keyboard version doesn't look right at all, especially with the 3 for 2 sticker. The last version is too disjointed(?) as to make it confusing, for me at least.

April 16, 2015

Roger Miles
Roger Miles says:

All good ideas and well done design team.

The fourth one (two keyboards) has the greatest impact. Partly because its simplicity of thought and line will grab the potential reader's attention across the bookshop - a significant factor in the all-important airport bookstall market, if that's a route you want to go.

The fifth is the best combination of design ideas but is slightly too 'busy' to be coherent; also stylistically looks like a heritage pitch, when in reality the Bletchley story is about so much more - Turing, women at work saving the nation, dawn of programmable computing, triumph of an intelligence-led strategy (Churchill) over a force-led strategy (Hitler)... etc etc. For that reason I'd also like to see a better developed version of cover number three - the Wren and the techie are good icons, but render them a bit more forcefully?

Can't wait to see the book, whatever the hive mind decides. Go Sue!

April 16, 2015

Roger Miles
Roger Miles says:

PS Picking up on Lee Maugher's point - maybe take the fourth cover idea but use Enigma's codewheels on the left, generic smartphone keyboard on the right? I share LM's concerns about Apple house style making your content look dated too quickly.

April 16, 2015

Jim Mortleman
Jim Mortleman says:

Hi Sue - love all the covers (with the exception of the keyboard one, which just didn't do it for me). I think which you choose will depend on the audience you're going for. While I like the last one, if you're aiming for a mainstream readership I think it might confuse or put off someone casually browsing an online bookseller's page or real-world bookshop shelf. I don't think you need to overthink it too much. For me, it's between the union jack (normal coloured one - the flag gets lost in the red one) and the bicycle cover. If you want to appeal to a more mainstream audience, the union jack edges it. If you're after a slightly more literary audience, I'd go with the bike. Just my tu'pporth. Can't wait to see it, whichever cover you choose! :-)

April 16, 2015

Jim Mortleman
Jim Mortleman says:

"tupp'orth", even :)

April 16, 2015

Max Cooter
Max Cooter says:

I like the third one - the cover with the WREN. I think it's the most aesthetically pleasing but also provides the best description of what the book's about

April 16, 2015

Jason Slater
Jason Slater says:

For me, the cover showing the wren on her bike points to a much deeper story than the ones that often focus on Turing.

April 16, 2015

beth massey
beth massey says:

Love two of them first, the picture of Turing and the Bletchly park mansion. So historical with a feeling of mystery. Second the cover of the Wren and her modern day counterpart. All the best! --Beth M.

April 16, 2015

J. Lynn Stapleton
J. Lynn Stapleton says:

I really like the third one with the Wren and her 21st century counterpart, as it demonstrates the importance of women's roles at Bletchley during the war, and the increase of women in STEM programs in IT and computer programming.

April 16, 2015

Dave Binkley
Dave Binkley says:

cheers sue ... my vote is the union jack with blue (the second one).

alas, the bad news is that the diversity of responses suggests that there is a better cover out there ;) ... happy hunting!!!

April 16, 2015

Nick Kelly
Nick Kelly says:

I think the union jack with blue is the strongest and most eye-catching cover. I think it clearly explains the concept of the book in a very bold way and includes the distinctive Enigma keys in a novel way.

If all the covers were lined up on a shelf, #2 would be the one I would pick up.

April 17, 2015

adriano parracciani
adriano parracciani says:

My favorite is the last one, because it contains the main concepts. Suggestion: change one of circles with a Wren "circle"

April 17, 2015

Len Keighley
Len Keighley says:

I like the very first one with the red Union Jack as the background but my favourite is the one with the old and new keyboards, it is very clear and gets the message of old and new worlds across directly. I find some of them very messy in terms of the title and author don't stand out very well, particularly the ones with the circles. Which ever you chose Sue will be great. I am really looking forward to reading it. Did you see a BBC2 programme in the early evening this week. There was a guy on who collected old computers, not just PCs but some big stuff as well. I am sure I saw an IBM mainframe in the background and he had loads on manuals. Anyway the BCS Conservation Society Committee visited to advise on how he could display it, including Past President Rachel Burnett. I think this could be your next book!

April 17, 2015

Sally Bean
Sally Bean says:

I only like the wren on the bike one - it's simpler, and the words explain what the book is about; I think the concept of contrasting the history and the campaign is pretty fundamental. The image in white could be improved upon - looks more like someone doing gymnastics than anything else.

April 17, 2015

Barry Cooper
Barry Cooper says:

I still like the original Red design. The light/dark design with the Wren on the bicycle is intriguing, but as others have mentioned before me the "modern" half needs a rethink as it doesn't capture the essence of what the book is trying to portray.
The old/new keyboard design doesn’t do anything for me, and agree with other comments that the yellow circle makes it look like a discounted book.
The final design has potential, but it looks too messy and cluttered with the small circles of the keys overlaying the larger circles. I also agree that Turing should not be the focus of the photo - he was merely one of a large team, and by using Turing's photo it is merely courting popular culture of the "Turing" phenomenon.

Whilst the focus on the cover design is all well and good, what i'd really like to hear is an update as to when we can actually expect to see the book published...

April 17, 2015

Phillipa Candy
Phillipa Candy says:

I like the style of the third cover, but the figures need some work. I prefer the last cover, it is a bit of a puzzle, although maybe too much as I can't spot Sue's name anywhere. Maybe not just using Turing's photo, but fragments of other peoples faces as well.

April 17, 2015

Jenny Sparks
Jenny Sparks says:

The first cover is easiest to read. The fourth one is a nice idea, but the type in the yellow circle makes it look a bit cheap. Last one is interesting, although it's busy with too much contrast, and the letter keys in the circles clash with the circles making up the title (QWSaving Bletchley UI JKPark?) :P

Keeping the title clear and readable should be a priority.

April 17, 2015

Dr Type
Dr Type says:

Red one or keyboard one.... They're the covers that would jump out at me in the book shop.

April 17, 2015

John Helliwell
John Helliwell says:

I like the two keyboard version, it is very stylish and would be most likely grab my attention. It looks good and subtly says a lot of what the book is about.

April 17, 2015

Jayne Samuel-Walker
Jayne Samuel-Walker says:

I prefer the last one.

I would suggest three different portraits rather than one broken image of Turing...perhaps Turing, Tommy Flowers (builder of Colossus http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_Flowers) and Joan Clarke (one of the very few female cryptanalysts at BP http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Clarke)?

April 17, 2015

Jayne Samuel-Walker
Jayne Samuel-Walker says:

Having said I like the last one best...on a second look, I also like #3 (but the woman on the bike could look more like a member of the WRNS).

I hate #4 with the Apple keyboard...totally inappropriate IMO!

Again, it's just my opinion, but I think the Union flags on the first two are too jingoistic.

April 17, 2015

Carol Long
Carol Long says:

I liked the original as it grabbed the eye (red) and was obviously about code breaking but I realise the book is more than that. The union flag version is a bit cluttered.
The wren on the bike makes it a bit Mary Poppins and the more modern figure posture doesn't add anything visually. Clever font idea. This could be mistaken for fiction.
Keyboards almost works. While enigma machines are linked to BPark, Apple isn't that big a part of the story. Yellow dot doesn't work.
Last one too cluttered as it stands and Turing doesn't need to be chopped up.
Alternative
Try 2 x 2 circles in top of cover each with a complete sepia or BW image that represents part of the story (including Turing once) on red background , BPark as a banner/strip photo in the middle, title and author below spelt out in Enigma keys on a black background

April 18, 2015

Photon Qyv
Photon Qyv says:

I like the third one the best, though perhaps as has been suggested previously, with re-worked images of a WREN and 21st contemporary. The final one is also good, I personally think even though Alan Turning has become the public face of Bletchley's history having him on the cover would suggest that his was the only contribution of importance. Having images of some of those other contributors, though less known, would make me, at least, even more interested in reading the book.

April 18, 2015

Christine Arrowsmith
Christine Arrowsmith says:

I like the third one but agree that the 'modern' techi is a bit unisex, i.e. it is not obviously female. Perhaps long hair of a pony tail?
I also like the last one but there is far too much sky. What about reducing the sky by moving the house up and placing the center part of the third one there? This is what happened here?

April 18, 2015

Alan Pollard
Alan Pollard says:

Sue, My order of preference is 1st the retro version (lady on bike etc), 2nd Union Jack background, 3rd Turing. I find the Turing version confusing. I like the idea but don't feel it stands out enough. The two keyboards one is a little boring (sorry). I think the retro one is the most likely to stand out. You might, perhaps, experiment with different coloured lettering. Red might work or put a slight blue tint to the roght hand side of the page.

April 18, 2015

Steve Van Domelen
Steve Van Domelen says:

Sue, if I had to pick one, it would be the Union Jack. But, here is another idea using some of the inspiration from the other covers. Top: random circular keys falling in a funnel shape. Middle: picture of Bletchley Park. Bottom: enigma machine keyboard with paper output saying "Saving Bletchley Park / by Sue Black" on it. Conveys the encryption idea and the important role of historic facility,

April 18, 2015

Steve Smith
Steve Smith says:

I prefer the third cover with the side by side "then and now" but I think the now character could be improved. Possibly the addition of a line drawing of the house spanning the two would help link the two sides.

April 19, 2015

Richard Mayston
Richard Mayston says:

The last one is the nicest, but agree the crops on the Turing image need fine tuning.

April 19, 2015

Richard Rixham
Richard Rixham says:

#3 or #5 get my vote, in that order

April 20, 2015

Adam Stone
Adam Stone says:

I like cover #5 as it has that hint of enigma/mystery whilst including Bletchley Park itself. I would, however, add Sue Black's name to the image.
Second is cover #3, though please get rid of the reference to Apple at the bottom - and possibly change the techy person's profile. Cover #4 - No. Again, Apple has nothing to do with Bletchley Park or the project to save Bletchley Park (as far as I'm aware).

April 20, 2015

Sue Black
Sue Black says:

Wow! Thank you all so much for your wonderful ideas and feedback. We had a good chat at our meeting at Unbound yesterday and were very excited at the quantity and quality of your fabulous comments. They were really helpful :)
Before the meeting I thought that number 4, as it represents the new and old, with the Apple keyboard changed for an iPhone keyboard might be best. I used, and still use my iPhone to do most of the tweeting :) I also thought #4 would probably be the most eye catching on the shelf, so that was also in its favour.
At our meeting we chatted around all the covers, and comments, and got quite excited about what we could do. We ended up with a favourite, not number 4, which along with a couple of new ideas, Unbound are getting mocked up, I'll let you know when it gets sent through.
We also discussed timescales for the book yesterday, we are currently on track for the subscriber edition being sent out in July and it being in the shops in September. Thank you all so, so much for your patience.
Sue x

April 21, 2015

Richard Truscott
Richard Truscott says:

I like the third and the fourth, though I do agree with most of the comments that the fourth needs other images, in full and not chopped up. I would like to see Tommy Flowers in one of the circles which should be made to look more like Enigma/Teleprinter key caps. Also the title and author should be kept within the cirle.

April 28, 2015

Rachael Marshall
Rachael Marshall says:

Number 3 appeals to me the most, but agree with some other commenters that the figures of the Wren and Sue need a bit of work. And surely Sue's hair should be red? (Even in silhouette!) Could a photograph of the mansion be incorporated? Oh - just about to post this and realised that you'd already had the meeting. Whatever the cover ends up as I'm looking forward to reading it.

April 29, 2015

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