Rummagining

Thursday, 16 March 2017

Digging through an archive is a bit like piecing together a puzzle. Most of the bits are there, but they need putting together, and once you have put them together you realise that something is missing. It's like the yarning, cryptic crosswords and QI (mixed in with a fair amount of drudgery.) But every so often things fit together in new and exciting ways.

I was intrigued to find out more about early performances of Le Marteau sans Maitre. Yes, I know, nasty modern music, but that was a big part of the Summer School. You could have your Mozart and Schubert, but you needed to listen to something written yesterday too. 

Pierre Boulez's notorious work was first performed in 1955 at the ISCM Festival in Baden-Baden but I was pretty sure its first UK performance was at Dartington.

To the archive!

First, a photo:  I can make out "Boulez" and Le Marteau sans maitre, but not much else. It's a picture of Ilona Halberstadt, a film producer and scholar, who later founded "Pix" magazine. She was also involved with Cornelius Cardew's Scratch Orchestra in the 60s. 

Then here's the concert programme: Thursday, August 9th, 1959 it says, in my father's handwriting. I can almost smell the roneo ink.

And then the chance introduction to the fearless conductor, John Carewe. Here's what he remembers: 
"The idea of doing it was mine. William [Glock] was enthusiastic. I had been in Paris studying with Messiaen and Boulez (I think 1956/7). I guess I gave my first concert (RFH recital room, based round 2 performances of Schoenberg's Chamber Symphony No 1) in Jan 1958 and William invited us to Dartington. Of course I knew Le Marteau and loved it and its challenges, hence my desire to do it..
There was a new printed version available. We started rehearsals about 7 months before that August. We had one session together (after which we sacked the percussionist and Richard Rodney Bennett took over the part). After that I took lots of rehearsals with one, two or three players. There was no guitarist at that time who could have played it so Cornelius Cardew learnt to play guitar! All the others were young professionals intrigued by the problems. In Dartington we rehearsed from 9.00 am to late evening for 5 or 6 days before the performance. I guess we got travel, bed and food and possibly £10 each for all that work.  But we loved it!"

Here's a (terrible) picture of them rehearsing.

Now I'm hoping to find someone who remembers hearing it for the first time.

Could that be you?

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