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The Accountant as Insult in the Morte Arthure

Monday, 18 June 2018

Brabantsche yeesten f

Being written in England around 1400, King Arthur’s Death sheds a fascinating light on the tactics, techniques and sheer plain talking of the English soldiering class around the time of Agincourt. Whoever wrote this astonishing poem was well-versed in how armies were organised and paid for, and, in so being, he highlights a side of warfare which still haunts us today: financiers don’t like fighters…

Enter the Dark Side of Chivalry - Meet the other Sir Gawain.

Thursday, 7 June 2018

Medieval dead edward iii v2

Battle plays a major part in the vivid writing of the fourteenth century masterpiece which is King Arthur’s Death (the Alliterative Morte Arthure; one of the key sources for Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur). Yet its anonymous poet chooses to tell us a tale not so much of chivalric romance but of the brutal horror of war. This is particularly true when we consider Sir Gawain, a leading character in…

King Arthur and the Giant of Mont Saint Michel – a gripping mediaeval horror story

Tuesday, 1 May 2018

Cerne abbas giant big

Above: The Cerne Abbas Giant in Dorset -  the basis of, or a model for, the predatory rapine giant in King Arthur's Death?

Giants and ogres are a common feature in mediaeval literature and in King Arthur’s Death (the Alliterative Morte Arthure) we are shown one who is surely one of the most gruesome to have been created. How did the poet manage to create such a vile beast, and one who remains…

Dragons and Dreams – the Uncertainty of Mediaeval Kings

Wednesday, 11 April 2018

Round table 2

When kings in the past were faced with aggression from abroad, how did they react – and why? In the Alliterative Morte Arthure (King Arthur’s Death) we are given significant insights into the diplomacy and thinking of mediaeval kings. It makes for gripping reading, far beyond what we might expect from such a poem.

Mediaeval life was dominated by religion, war and the whim of God. If calamity…

Sharp eyes and steady hands - Illustrating the Alliterative Morte Arthure

Saturday, 31 March 2018

King arthur cropped with water mark

My new translation of the Alliterative Morte Arthure (King Arthur’s Death) begins a new journey for me: translating a vibrant poem of the late fourteenth century (which, incidentally, has a number of hidden meanings) and illustrating it in pen-and-ink. For this post, I want to show you the process I use in my illustrative work, focusing on an illustration of King Arthur himself.

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