Cover of Dead Writers in Rehab

Welcome to my writer's shed, do you like what I've done with the place?

Wednesday, 20 January 2016

Come in, come in, don't mind the dog, that's just his way of showing he likes you. Oh, he seems to have got overexcited, sorry about that, I'll get a cloth. Or would you like to take those trousers off and I'll sponge them down? All right, please yourself. Right, gather round the fire, pull up a comfortable view on your device. Firstly, I want to say a huge thank you to everyone who has pledged for Dead Writers in Rehab or supported it in any way at all in these vital first few days. And I also want to ask everyone who hasn't pledged but is thinking about it to stop thinking, unless you're thinking of pledging for an even higher level than you were originally thinking of. In that case, keep thinking, but not for too long.

Let's be frank, this whole process is slightly weird, and, to be honest, rather scary for me. But I'm not going to admit that. (NB: whoever edits this, please take that bit out. What's that? We should leave it in because it makes me seem human and vulnerable? Oh, right, good point. Leave it in. But take this bit out.) Other than that, I have little to say excpet that I'll have more to say the next time you drop by. Particularly about Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He's one of the deceased literary substance abusers who features in the book. I've been fascinated by Coleridge for a very long time, and among other things I've written two radio plays that feature him in one way or another. One of them is based on something that actually happened to him and Wordsworth, when they were mistaken for French spies, and is so bizarre that you would be very hard pushed to invent it. More soon.

Oh look, is that the time? I never knew it was so linear, as Stephen Hawking says when he wants to leave a dull party. You'd better go. Does anyone want a dog? No, he doesn't understand what I said, and know that I want to get rid of him. He often gives me a playful nip like that. Oh hell. Ignore the blood. Just leave.

See you soon. PBD. X.

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Comments

Lucy Gibbon
Lucy Gibbon says:

I remember subscribing to a book about 30 years ago, where the author actually went round to everyone's houses asking for money. Changed days. This seems a little less daunting for the authors.

January 20, 2016

Shirley Brown
Shirley Brown says:

Strange symmetry in your mentioning two radio plays featuring Samuel Taylor Coleridge, as my decision to pledge for Dead Writers in Rehab was directly influenced by recently listening to the "other" one, The Ancient Mariner's Wife - very funny and clever , illuminating and engaging, as I'm sure the novel will be.

January 20, 2016

paul bassett davies
paul bassett davies says:

Hi Lucy, that reminds me of a brilliant thing that John Otway once did, many years ago (certainly pre-internet) when he released a new single, and a limited number of them were pressed without the vocal track; there was a note inside the cover with a phone number, and if you phoned it John would arrange to come to your house and sing the vocals over the record. (I think I've got that story right. Someone can probably verify it. Maybe John.)

January 20, 2016

paul bassett davies
paul bassett davies says:

Hi Shirley, when you say you heard The Ancient Mariner's Wife "recently" was it on the radio? I never find out when they repeat my stuff until after it's broadcast. Anyway, I'm glad you liked that one, and I hope you'll enjoy the book.

January 20, 2016

Shirley Brown
Shirley Brown says:

Hi Paul, No, not a live broadcast, I'd recorded it off-air onto an audio cassette in 2005, decided to chuck out my old tapes but when I saw the label on that one I couldn't resist another listen first .... then it's such a good radio play that "your" tape has survived the purge. I don't know who decides to re-broadcast BBC radio plays, but I very much hope more listeners get a chance to hear The Ancient Mariner's Wife.

January 21, 2016

paul bassett davies
paul bassett davies says:

Thanks Shirley. I sometimes use The Ancient Mariner's Wife in the Writing for Radio workshop I run, as an example of how radio is good at evoking worlds that can be quite fantastical, as long as they obey their own internal logic. And I was very lucky with the cast in that play, and all my other radio dramas, for that matter. That's another great gift of radio: you get some outstanding actors, some of them quite big names. That's partly because radio can be relatively relaxed for an actor (no costumes or makeup, no need to learn lines) and partly just because some of them love the medium - as I do.

January 22, 2016

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Published
Publication date: May 2017
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