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Blood On The Stone

By Jake Lynch

Historical mystery thriller about a detective who defends justice and human rights.

Crime | History
104% funded
154 supporters
Published

Publication date: Spring 2019

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King Charles II brings the English parliament to Oxford, amid sectarian hysteria over a so-called ‘Popish Plot’ against the throne. 

William Harbord, an MP and leader of an extremist Protestant group, the Green Ribbon Club, is found stabbed to death. Luke Sandys, Chief Officer of Bailiffs, must investigate, with his trusty deputy, Robshaw.

Luke is an Oxford Classics graduate and a devotee of scientific methods. He missed out on an academic career to marry Elizabeth, who was carrying his child – instead following his father into the trade of fine joinery. He is secretly in love with Cate, daughter of a Catholic couple who run a local inn where the vaults are used for illegal Romish sacraments.

Agitators blame Harbord’s death on ‘Papists’ and use it to stir the mob. There is a riot in which Luke is slightly injured. He realises he is in a race against time – to solve the murder before the wave of prejudice and fury can engulf the local Catholic population, including Cate. “I’m not having people picked on!”, he declares. “Not just because they happen to praise God in a different way. ‘Tis wrong!”

To identify the killer, he has to rely as much on Robshaw’s stout yeoman common sense, and his own scholarly background, as on evidence and logic.

Meanwhile, the Green Ribbons plan a ‘spectacular’ – a gruesome ritual, supposedly to show the market day crowds how ‘Papists’ should be dealt with. Luke scrambles to find an angle he can use to foil their conspiracy.

As lines of inquiry converge, Luke’s heart pulls him one way, while duty pulls in the opposite direction. Which will he choose to follow? Will he crack the case in time? And will he declare his love?

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  • Jake Lynch avatar

    Jake Lynch

    Jake Lynch is Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Sydney, and the author of seven books and over 50 refereed articles and book chapters. Over 20 years, he has pioneered both research and practice in the field of Peace Journalism, for which he was recognised with the 2017 Luxembourg Peace Prize, awarded by the Schengen Peace Foundation.


    He has held Fellowships at the Universities of Johannesburg, Bristol and Cardiff, where he read English Literature and got a Diploma in Journalism Studies. His PhD was from City University, London.


    Before taking up an academic post, Jake enjoyed a successful career in journalism, with spells as a Political Correspondent for Sky News at Westminster and the Sydney correspondent for the Independent newspaper, culminating in a role as a presenter (anchor) for BBC World Television News.


    Jake divides his time between Australia and Oxford, where he performs in amateur dramatic productions and runs a local book group. He is married with a teenaged son.

  • Elizabeth had not long gone up to bed, declaring that she had “aboused and bolled enough for one night” – more than enough, Luke thought – when there came a thunderous knock at the door.
    “Sorry to disturb, sirs”. A great dark overcoat made Robshaw’s outline in the candlelight even more bearlike than usual.
    “What is it, Robshaw?”
    “A body, sir. Night Watch found it, a short while ago, on the doorstep of that there new tavern, where we was earlier”.
    “Have you seen it?”
    “Not yet – one of the proctors knocked me up and I came straight here. ‘Tis said he’s been stabbed”. Luke felt twist of dread: the political atmosphere already contained enough tension, as their supper conversation had affirmed. An act of violence, as MPs and their hangers-on converged on the city, smelt of trouble.
    “You did right. Very well, let’s go”.

    The grey of the once-distinguished temples seemed to have drained through the face, washing out the vitality, as Luke peered down at the still, beaky face and splayed figure of the man who had introduced himself to them earlier as William Harbord, MP. Steady luminescence from the clear night sky mingled with the guttering light of Robshaw’s lantern as he held it above the body.
    “There’s the wound”, the deputy pointed out unnecessarily, as the two light sources refracted in the congealed surface of a pool of blood emanating from Harbord’s abdomen.
    “Where’s the weapon?” One of the University proctors, who had stood guard over the scene, piped up in reply.
    “Can’t be found, sir”.
    “Well, hasn’t been found, anyway”, Luke corrected him. “We’ll have to take a proper look in daylight”.

    “I’ll need to clean up this here step, sirs”. Unsworth had pulled on coat and boots over his vest and canions, against the chill, and was now shifting agitatedly from foot to foot, a grimace of dismay etched on his features. The innkeeper had been held back from the murder scene by the watchmen, who looked a question in Luke’s direction. He nodded.
    “May as well move it now, we can’t learn anything else here for the moment. Robshaw, put the body in my parlour”. The ‘parlour’ was in fact a wide stone landing at the head of a staircase down to a small cellar, behind Sandys’ office at the back of the Guildhall, a little further up Fish Street. Robshaw jingled his bunch of keys at the men to fetch the low cart they used to scoop up the dead and the dead-drunk alike from the city streets.

    Turning to the innkeeper, Luke asked curtly: “So he was lodging, as well as drinking, in your unlicensed premises?” Unsworth’s voice and manner assumed their default attitude of obsequious wheedling.
    “That he was, Master Sandys sir, though he was ever such a proper gentleman, sir”.
    “That’s beside the point, Unsworth, as well you know. You told the Night Watch that you heard and saw nothing of this… incident? No altercation, no raised voices?” Unsworth made as if to say something, then glumly shook his head. “Very well. I shall want to talk to you further tomorrow. Make sure you’re here, or if you must go out, don’t go far”.
    “Yessir”, he nodded, relieved.

    Luke held open the door at the back of the Guildhall, off the stable yard. Harbord’s corpse was manhandled in, and through to the chamber at the back of his office, lain on a trestle table and covered with a length of muslin. Then he bade his deputy goodnight, locked up, and walked slowly back along Fish Street, towards the river. Unsworth was, sure enough, swabbing the threshold of The Unicorn and Jacob’s Well, too preoccupied to notice him passing by on the other side. The imposing limestone of Christ Church formed an apparently impenetrable barrier. Surely the King would be safe here? Though, on second thoughts, men still talked of the nine-pound shell fired by the New Model Army, during the siege of Oxford in the time of His Majesty’s father, Charles I, which had thudded against the wall of the college dining hall.

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  • Jake Lynch has written 2 private updates. You can pledge to get access to them all.

    23rd October 2018 On Western Civilisation

    One of the themes in Blood on the Stone is the new epistemology, emerging and spreading in the early modern period, based on scientific methods. First when seeking to understand the natural world, and then in other spheres including both law enforcement and political systems, authority was increasingly sought by rigorous observation to gather data, which was then processed by reason - rather than…

    7th September 2018 Nearly there!

    Huge thanks to all my supporters so far. Blood on the Stone is now over 90% funded! So just needs one final push to make 100%.

    Please do continue to spread the word... any pledges above the 100% will go straight into promoting the book. That's the next big job!

    Hugs,

    Jake

    28th August 2018 Why I've written an historical novel: article for TRANSCEND Media Service

    In this article, I explain that I have turned to writing novels because we may now be in a time when it is easier to reach people, and to activate humanitarian concerns, with fiction than with factual reporting - although of course we still need the best journalism we can possibly get.

    https://www.transcend.org/tms/2018/08/why-ive-written-an-historical-novel/ 

    22nd August 2018 Halfway in two weeks! Spread the word...

    Wow! Blood on the Stone has been crowdfunding for two weeks, and is already halfway to the target. Thanks to everyone who's contributed so far! Please do spread the word to friends who you think might like a good read.

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  • Ken Macnab
    Ken Macnab asked:

    Jake, Why did you choose this particular time frame for the novel? Cheers, Ken

    Jake Lynch
    Jake Lynch replied:

    Good question Ken, thanks. Oxford in the 17th Century was a crucible of the so-called Scientific Revolution, a period bookended (pun intended and significant) by the publication of Copernicus's heliocentric theory in 1539, and Newton's Principia Mathematica in 1687. Luke, my hero, gets a taste for such ideas while attending meetings of the Wadham scientific circle in his student days. He is convinced the same methods can yield results in his investigations of crime. Point is, the scientific methods then being pioneered are concerned with what we know and how we know it. As that is the same game a detective novel plays with the reader, it seemed an obvious fit.